Army Drops DJI Citing Cybersecurity Concerns

Army Drops DJI Citing Cybersecurity Concerns

By Thomas L. Gemmell

According to a Department of Defense memorandum referenced by sUAS News, the U.S. Army and Navy have concluded that there are cybersecurity risks associated with using Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), or “drones,” manufactured by Dajiang Innovation (DJI), the world’s most prolific developer and manufacturer of commercial and hobby drones. Citing research memoranda by the Army Research Laboratory, DJI UAS Technology Threat and User Vulnerabilities, dated 24 May 2017, and Navy, Operational Risks With Regards to DJI Family of Products, dated 24 May 2017, the Army directed the Service to discontinue all uses of DJI products, including “all DJI UAS and any system that employs DJI electrical components or software including, but not limited to, flight computers, cameras, radios, batteries, speed controllers, GSS units, handheld control stations, or devices with DJI software applications installed.” The ban is significant given that the Army had "issued over 300 separate Airworthiness Releases for DJI products in support of multiple organizations with a variety of mission sets.” Without going into detail, the Army noted that the order was “Due to increased awareness of cyber vulnerabilities associated with DJI products.”

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Artificial Intelligence Legal Revolution - It Began with Parking Tickets...

Artificial Intelligence Legal Revolution - It Began with Parking Tickets...

By Adam P. Daniels

There was applause for IBM Corp.’s Watson when it beat Ken Jennings on Jeopardy, and people reveled at Google’s AlphaGo when it defeated Ke Jie, a Go world champion. But what about the intersection of Artificial Intelligence and the law?

Recently, on July 12, 2017, Joshua Browder announced a major upgrade to his free legal aid chatbot, DoNotPay, which has already helped fight 375,000 parking tickets in the U.K, New York, and Seattle. As part of the major upgrade, Browder introduced 1,000 new chatbots to help generate transactional forms in a variety of new legal areas in all 50 U.S. states and the U.K. In addition, Browder also announced the DoNotPay platform is open to anyone that wants to create a “law bot” to assist clients with identifying and filling out relevant legal documents.

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Crowded Skies are Coming

Crowded Skies are Coming

By Tyler Short

Google recently completed a series of tests related to multiple unmanned aircraft systems operating in the same airspace. The tests were carried out by Google and organized by the FAA and NASA. With an eye towards creating a world where delivery by unmanned aircraft systems is a reality, Google has created a traffic management platform that has the capabilities of automatically plotting the paths of multiple unmanned aircraft systems and then updating the paths while in mid-flight. This platform may be the key to operating several unmanned aircraft systems in the same area.

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Emerging UAS Industry Triggers Growth in Specialty Insurance Market

Emerging UAS Industry Triggers Growth in Specialty Insurance Market

By William D. Ezzell

Unmanned Aerial Systems are without a doubt at the forefront of aerial innovation. As an emerging industry that is inherently fraught with risk, it should come as little surprise that the insurance market is quickly trying to capture and develop this promising new market. 

One major carrier, Liberty Mutual, recently announced a joint venture with Acend, Inc. to launch a new drone insurance platform. Details remain to be seen (the company states that it will begin writing policies this summer). And we are closely following the types of common and unique risks these policies should protect against.

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Nearly Instantaneous Crop Data

Nearly Instantaneous Crop Data

By Tyler Short

HAEVIC, a South African drone manufacturer has introduced a new drone platform called the AgriAnalys Drone, which contains an installed multispectral camera recently acquired by HAEVIC. The drone is able to perform its flight survey for nearly 50 minutes, and the camera begins to process information while the drone remains in flight. 

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